Taijitu

a forum specifically for the variation(s) of Taiji found within Reeders' arts.
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lorene
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Post by lorene »

Thank you Mike for the response. I've inserted some quick comments:

"The taijitu is part of what is known as the wuhsing/pakua correlate which includes the Five Elements and the Pakua diagrams. They are an extension or expansion on the basic taijitu or yin/yang. Far as I know this is all part of the I ching philosophy. "

Wu Chi: oneness, no extremes, the uncarved block, the infinite, void, empty, pre-heaven, tranquility, potential

Wu Chi (body and spirit united) then Tai Chi, Tai Chi: ying/yang flow (two elements), and then four phenomena (metal, wood, water, fire), and then Pa Kua/eight trigrams (Heaven, Earth, Thunder, Wind, Water, Fire, Mountain, and Lake).

"The central tenet is Balance which is achieved, or created by the interaction of pairs of opposites. It shows the cyclic nature of events and how extremes always transform into their opposites. Somewhere, in between the poles of opposition, in that range of activity, a point of balance can be found. "

Helpful ways to think about Tai Chi symbol

Break into components
Outer circle
Active Yin/Yang fish
Fish eyes
Wave line
Understanding the whole (Inside and Outside)
Ways of drawing the symbol and why all the different ways

A discussion involving the above characteristics will take a while. I think I?ll return to write more after a good night?s sleep.


"The study of the martial arts can be greatly enhanced by the understanding of yin/yang correlation as many instructions are based on this paradigm, mostly especially if they are Chinese based arts, like the Liu Seong system."

Relate Tai Chi symbol to practice of Liu Seong system? I have thought about this a little, and will comment at a later time.

lorene
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The outer circle

Post by lorene »

Tai Chi symbol: Outer circle

Some thoughts about the circle:
The circle symbolizes transformation and ?continuous movement?.
Cycles such as seasons, solar cycle, lunar cycle, breathing, and circulation are examples of this movement.
With a circle, there is no clear beginning and ending. There is no point on the circle which stands out from the rest. All of it is completely connected and flows.

A favorite image associated with this continuous movement is that of waves moving in and out. The water flows forward and meets with water flowing backward and on and on. The water is all connected which is made more evident by water breaking on the shore. You see it break and then retreat only to break again and rejoin the sea. The wave break is evidence of the ongoing movement of the whole sea. The ongoing push and pull never stops, as with yin/yang. Thus it seems continuous movement is a central concept in the Tai Chi symbol. Once there is movement, the movement is continuous. Everything within the circle is active and moving.

The difference between the outer circle and inner yin/yang:
Knowing that the circle represents cycles, movement, and connectedness, it is easier to see how the yin/yang will always be moving together as one; a balance of opposites struggling with and complementing one other.

The outer circle has also been called the Wu Chi stage, a state of opportunity or potential. There are not yet extremes because there is not yet movement.

The circle and martial movement:
When you move, the entire body moves. The hand is not alone, the foot is not alone? the goal is to move as one. (more on this later?)

Lorene