Confusion Training Method

a forum for the discussion of philosophical approaches to training and the resultant effect on concept and instruction.
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gyrebox
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Confusion Training Method

Post by gyrebox »

Does anyone use a confusion training method in their teaching or has anyone trained under this method? I have been trained mainly from this method and have found interesting results.
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Sifu Guro Dan Donzella
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confusion?

Post by Sifu Guro Dan Donzella »

Elaborate a little on this method so to fill us in on what you mean by "confusion method"

gyrebox
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Post by gyrebox »

Confucion as in Confucius. Sorry about that mix up.
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kungfujoe
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Post by kungfujoe »

gyrebox wrote:Confucion as in Confucius. Sorry about that mix up.
I'd still be interested in an elaboration. I did a quick search on the Internet, and what I saw of the Confucian method seems to fit pretty well with how I learned (self perfection through appreciation of all things and a focus on tradition). However, Lao Tzu's methods, which are supposedly opposed to Confucius' methods, also seem to reflect significant aspects of what I've learned (remaining nondescript, not calling undue attention to yourself, etc).

What little I found on the Confucian method of teaching focused on perfection through repetition and tradition (e.g. in the case of grade school, having children repeat and become intimately familiar with classic literature) also seems to fit. Repetition is a key component of any physical training, and despite some calling our art a modern art (because of the relatively recent synthesis of the current form[s] of the art by Reeders), it is paradoxically composed of ostensibly very traditional methods, exercises, and forms. Learning those training methods exactly as they were taught generations ago is seen as very important.

I'm not sure I agree with this method of teaching in an academic sense, but in terms of martial arts training, I've seen the results it can produce, understand much of the rationale behind it, and agree that it is most effective.

However, I'm only passingly familiar with the Confucian method (having just gleaned a bit from an Internet search), and am interested in hearing your perspective on what it entails.


P.S. There are times when I'd definitely say that I've also learned via the confusion method. ;)
Erik Harris
Chinese-Indonesian Martial Arts Club

"A man's not a man when he takes the lower road,
Dragging his tail to cover his tracks" -dTb