Herbs

Herbs for dit da jow (bruises), medicine internal and external, food therapy, etc...
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jkinnear
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Herbs

Post by jkinnear » December 7th, 2006, 8:10 pm

If anyone is in need of herbs for any reason please contact me. I can get most any herb or can recommend a good substitute. Soon Dr. Edward Jackson and I will open our herb pharmacy in Durango, CO. So naturally we will have access to most things and can probably get you a fair price.

Peace,
Jeffrey

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AbuSana'
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Post by AbuSana' » December 7th, 2006, 8:11 pm

Brother Jeff,

just wanted to let you know I got my order, now I just need to find a gallon size glass jar! LOL!!!

Thank you.

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Post by AbuSana' » December 7th, 2006, 8:11 pm

can you give some advice on the use of Dit Da Jow?

Should you apply it on a regular basis, irregardless of sparring times?

Also, is it something that affects the epidermal layers rather than the muscle tissues beneath?

are these stupid questions?

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use of dit da jow

Post by jkinnear » December 7th, 2006, 8:11 pm

You can apply dit da jow regularly to the joints to keep them strong and healthy. Vigorously rub it into the elbows and knees. It can also be used before, during, and after iron palm and other body toughening techniques. There are stories of some of the old world masters bathing in "special lotions" when they were children. I suppose it was a jow recipe to make them grow strong.

The main thing that jow does is increase the flow of qi and invigorate the blood. If you have a bruise then there is stagnant blood. If there is no damage then the increased qi and blood encourages cell growth. It does go deep to the bone level, but it does not penetrate the bone. For that you want zheng gu shui. It was designed by the Chinese bone setters in the 1970's.

And no, those aren't stupid questions.
Jeffrey Kinnear L.Ac., Dipl. O.M., MSOM

The only constant is change, the only absolute is vodka.

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Post by kungfujoe » December 7th, 2006, 8:12 pm

General consensus has always been that Dit Da Jow is toxic. I've never tried drinking it, but given the number of people who have told me that it'll kill me (or at least make me very sick), I'm in no hurry to test its toxicity (even though the simplified method I'm familiar with for making it doesn't involve any really toxic source ingredients). :)
Erik Harris
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Dragging his tail to cover his tracks" -dTb

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jkinnear
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drinking dit da jow

Post by jkinnear » December 7th, 2006, 8:12 pm

Yes, you can drink dit da jow. At least some formulas. The Wong Fei Hong formula that I make has nothing in it that is toxic. It may purge the bowels though because of the da huang. And other herbs commonly used is jow formulas can irritate the stomach. It is harsh to drink dit da jow because it is so strong. It is designed to penetrate deep into tissue from the outside.
There are other formulas intended for internal use that are better and more pleasant to take. The patent teh ta wan is dit da jow for internal and external use. Teh Ta is another spelling for dit da. Wan means pill. Jow means wine. So if you keep those pills handy you can take them internally and add one to some alcohol to rub on the outside.
Then there is the Zhu Yu Tang family of formulas for internal blood stasis. There are several formulas and of course modifications to address different areas or organs.
So to wrap it up, I would not recommend drinking dit da jow often or regularly. But if you got hit really hard and suspect internal trauma from it, a shot of dit da jow may be just what the doctor ordered.
If you think you need some internal "tonic" contact me or another trained professional for consultation.
Jeffrey Kinnear L.Ac., Dipl. O.M., MSOM

The only constant is change, the only absolute is vodka.

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Non-toxic Dit Da Jow

Post by kungfujoe » December 7th, 2006, 8:13 pm

I had been told by a number of practitioners from different systems that the stuff was toxic. Even though I knew none of the original ingredients were toxic, I assumed that the fact that creating it concentrates the ingredients a good deal might make it toxic.

Speaking of Jow toxicity... I made some quite awhile ago, and it's had a good deal of time to "brew." I used some awhile ago after getting some fairly deep bruises, and I appear to have a contact allergy to the stuff that I made. :( After some surgery on my knuckle about a year ago, my skin seems to have developed a hypersensitivity to quite a few things. I'm hoping that sensitivity will fade in the coming years (since I never had it before; it seems to have been caused by having Neosporin under a bandage on my skin for many weeks straight, which caused a terrible rash that spread to the rest of my body before going away). After about three days of using my dit da jow, I had developed a minor rash at the application site. I haven't had this happen before. Does anyone know if there's much likelihood that I could be reacting to the whiskey used instead of the tieh tah wan? I'm more than willing to buy another brand o' booze, make another batch, and wait six months for it to mature, but I don't want to go that route if it's going to cause me to react in the same manner.
Erik Harris
Chinese-Indonesian Martial Arts Club

"A man's not a man when he takes the lower road,
Dragging his tail to cover his tracks" -dTb

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Post by AbuSana' » December 7th, 2006, 8:13 pm

mbar wrote:Jeff,

will it work better if i drink the dit da jow?

peace.

mike
I laughed out loud with this one!

Little did I know....

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AbuSana'
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Post by AbuSana' » May 20th, 2007, 11:36 am

Brother Jeff,

can you get your hands on yohimbe? I can only find an extract, but my religion restricts me from using it as it contains alcohol.

I noticed years ago at your house that you boiled everything, in glass pots. That's how I've been using my ginseng and other stuff. Had to wait until I got my glass pot though. This should be sufficient, correct? As a replacement for an alcohol based extract?

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Post by AbuSana' » June 1st, 2008, 12:54 pm

only gets better with time.


I started my brew in february of 2007. I waited six months for it to brew, agitating it everyday. It worked okay.

I've been off from training for a year, and now that I'm getting back into it, I'm finding out that I am totally out of condition. Well, after letting most of the stuff sit for over a year, I'm finally starting to use it, and it is amazing!

I had shoulder surgery the top of the year. I finally went back to class (MMA, JKD concepts). Everyone told me that my shoulder would be really sore, since this is the first time I worked it out in a year. I put some dit da jow on it, and wouldn't you know it, my whole body was sore, except for my shoulder!

Last night I put some of the jow on most of my muscles, but since I had socks on, I neglected my feet. Well, today, my entire body feels good, except for my feet, lol! So I just applied some to my feet, and I started feeling the benefits almost immediately.

Now, please don't call my objectivity into question. I consider my very objective. I just know how my body felt before application and after application.

Thanks Jeff.

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